just lots of things

foxesinbreeches:

Shadow, Chicago / Untitled by Marvin E. Newman, 1951

Also

(via hollyhocksandtulips)

illustratedladies:

Leonard Shortall

theonlycal said: i asked a boy out with taco bell and he turned me down so i threw the baja blast all over him

tacobell:

No one’s worth wasting Baja Blast over.

nprfreshair:

Fresh Air book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews Ride Around Shining

Most sports novels are about the aspiration to excel physically: to run faster, stretch out one’s arms farther.  The really cool thing about Ride Around Shining, a debut novel by Chris Leslie-Hynan, is that it doesn’t stick to that familiar rulebook.   Even though it’s set in the world of pro basketball, our narrator here is not the guy who aspires to be a great player; rather, he’s the guy who aspires to be a great suck-up to the great player.  Jess, as our narrator is called, is a white bread grad student, finishing his “second useless degree.”   One day, he hears that a player for the Portland Trail Blazers, named Calyph West, is looking for a chauffeur and Jess lands the job.  Thus, begins Jess’s life of eager servitude, driving Calyph around in his “entry level” Jag, waiting on the party guests who swarm into Calyph’s McMansion on weekends, and even helping Calyph to dress, choosing from his array of beautiful suits, in pearl gray, honey butter and pinstripe silver

If your literary allusion antennae have begun twitching, you’ve read your Fitzgerald.  This novel about nouveau riche excess, social class, and hero worship references The Great Gatsby on practically every page, beginning with Jess’s retrospective Nick Carroway-like narration, as well as that premise of a white chauffeur driving around his rich black passenger—that’s a scene that mirrors the famous “Queensboro Bridge” passage in Gatsby.

clarabows:

Happy 109th birthday Clara Bow! 29th July 1905.

I loved her. She was so generous, no snootiness or anything. She was wonderful to me.”
- Jean Arthur

"I felt Clara was just marvelous, and I loved her. I feel very sorry for her, terribly sorry for her personally. She had such a sad life."
- Colleen Moore

"I was introduced to Clara Bow. I think we just said ‘hello.’ She was a bit nervous and was seemingly in haste. She was there to act and perform and she wanted to get started. I remember she was very nice and not an ‘It’ Girl at all. She was very quiet and not talkative. She wore a pleated skirt with a big belt around her waist and was very graceful. I could tell how talented she was because she could use her face so well. Whenever she spoke, her eyebrows would go up. She was very small with lovely hair over her forehead and great big eyes. She seemed insecure about the talkies and found the whole thing overwhelming. I remember hearing her say, ‘It’s all so new to me.’ She was all alone there. She’d go into make-up alone and do it herself and she’d come on the set alone. She didn’t depend on anybody. I didn’t think the studio was supporting her. She was such a big star and I think she could have had a longer career if they had been more helpful. I was impressed with what a nice girl she really was."
- Marian Marsh

"On Screen she was bigger than anybody. But off the screen she disappeared like an over-exposed negative."
- Louise Brooks

“Clara Bow is the quintessence of what the term ‘flapper’ signifies as a definite description: pretty, impudent, superbly assured, as worldly-wise, briefly-clad and ‘hard-berled’ as possible. There were hundreds of them, her prototypes. Now, completing the circle, there are thousands more, patterning themselves after her. It is rather futile to analyse flappers. They are just girls, all sorts of girls, their one common trait being that they are young things with a splendid talent for living.”
- F. Scott Fitzgerald

"When she is on the screen nothing else matters. When she is off, the same is true".
- Photoplay

"Then we were doing the death scene—Josef von Sternberg was directing that. She was dying, and I was kneeling beside her, weeping. She was chewing gum. She had this great wad of gum in her face when they said, ‘All right, Clara, get the gum out. We’re going to shoot the scene.’ She took the gum out, put it back of her ear, and died. Well, that struck me as so funny, I howled, and they had to wait for me to stop laughing before I could cry again."
- Esther Ralston

"If ever a star was made by public demand, it was Clara Bow."
- Adela Rogers St. Johns

"When Bow was at her height in pictures we could make a story with her in it and gross a million and a half, where another actress would gross half a million in the same picture and with the same cast."
- David Selznick

"This girl was the real thing, someone to stir every pulse in the nation."
- F. Scott Fitzgerald.

"There was no rivalry whatever between us. She had her part and I had mine. But I feel very sorry because one night, I think it was the night we finished the picture, I was giving a big party at my house and I had to rush home. Her dressing room was right next door to mine, and she must have known that I was giving a big party. All the Hollywood people, directors and everybody, were coming. She was standing in her doorway, and she said, ‘You’re having a party, aren’t you, Esther?’ I said, ‘Yes. Oh, would you like to come, Clara?’ ‘No, no’ she said, ‘I know you don’t want me.’ I’ve never forgotten that."
- Esther Ralston

"… Clara Bow lingers in the eye, long after the picture has gone."
Variety, 1924

(via justlittleclassicfilmthings)

wapiti3:

Lepidoptera Exotica, or Descriptions and Illustrations of Exotic Lepidoptera. 1869-1874 / by Arthur Gardiner Butler. on Flickr.

Publication info London :E.W. Janson,1874.
BHL Collections:
Smithsonian Libraries

(via scientificillustration)

lindahall:

Trees from North American Sylva, 1865, by Thomas Nuttall and Francois Michaux.

(via scientificillustration)

retrocampaigns:

Hi everyone! Just a little heads-up: Normally I have an original post in the morning and a reblog in the afternoon, but I really really need to get working on the new website, so this week’s morning posts will be kind of a Retro Campaigns Best Of! Well, some of my favorites, anyway. I’ll be back with original posts next week! As always, thanks for following - Christine retrocampaigns:

"A beautiful goblet of White House champagne" or an "An ugly mug of log-cabin hard cider" Of the losing Whig candidates in 1836, William Henry Harrison was most successful, so he was chosen to oppose incumbent Martin Van Buren. The Democrats must have been elated: Harrison was old - older by 20 years than Van Buren. And he hadn’t really been involved in the Washington political scene for years. Even with the financial crisis of 1837 it probably seemed like Van Buren could secure a second term. The law of unintended consequences played out shortly thereafter when a Democratic newspaper in Baltimore openly dismissed Harrison’s candidacy, implying he was a simpleton, ready to be put out to pasture:"Give him a barrel of hard cider, and settle a pension of $2,000 on him, and our word for it, he will sit the remainder of his days in his log cabin by the side of the sea-coal fire and study moral philosophy." The image of Harrison as a log cabin-dwelling “every man,” enjoying a good cider and a warm fire, was exactly what the Whigs needed to energize the masses. Hedging their bets, Van Buren was portrayed as a blue-blooded dandy, aloof and unresponsive to the concerns of the common man. In reality he was born to a humble Dutch farming family and left school at age 14.Martin Van Buren mechanical pull-tab card from the Syracuse University Library Special Collections Research Center. H/T to ceyths, where I first found it.



THIS WAS MY ENTIRE SOPHOMORE YEAR OF HIGH SCHOOL

retrocampaigns:

Hi everyone! Just a little heads-up: Normally I have an original post in the morning and a reblog in the afternoon, but I really really need to get working on the new website, so this week’s morning posts will be kind of a Retro Campaigns Best Of! Well, some of my favorites, anyway. I’ll be back with original posts next week! As always, thanks for following -

Christine

retrocampaigns:

"A beautiful goblet of White House champagne" or an "An ugly mug of log-cabin hard cider"

Of the losing Whig candidates in 1836, William Henry Harrison was most successful, so he was chosen to oppose incumbent Martin Van Buren. The Democrats must have been elated: Harrison was old - older by 20 years than Van Buren. And he hadn’t really been involved in the Washington political scene for years. Even with the financial crisis of 1837 it probably seemed like Van Buren could secure a second term.

The law of unintended consequences played out shortly thereafter when a Democratic newspaper in Baltimore openly dismissed Harrison’s candidacy, implying he was a simpleton, ready to be put out to pasture:

"Give him a barrel of hard cider, and settle a pension of $2,000 on him, and our word for it, he will sit the remainder of his days in his log cabin by the side of the sea-coal fire and study moral philosophy."

The image of Harrison as a log cabin-dwelling “every man,” enjoying a good cider and a warm fire, was exactly what the Whigs needed to energize the masses. Hedging their bets, Van Buren was portrayed as a blue-blooded dandy, aloof and unresponsive to the concerns of the common man. In reality he was born to a humble Dutch farming family and left school at age 14.

Martin Van Buren mechanical pull-tab card from the Syracuse University Library Special Collections Research Center. H/T to ceyths, where I first found it.

THIS WAS MY ENTIRE SOPHOMORE YEAR OF HIGH SCHOOL

ridesabike:

Jane Withers rides a bike. A Monark Silver King, no less.

ridesabike:

Jane Withers rides a bike. A Monark Silver King, no less.

John Waters’ Cry-Baby (1990)

(Source: vintagegal, via vintagegal)